Holidays In Mexico Medical Tourists Celebrate And Get Well

Holidays In Mexi.co Medical Tourists Celebrate And Get Well watching pints. https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http%3A%2F%2Felcamion.co.uk%2Fassets%2F2015%2F12%2FScreen-Shot-2015-12-07-at-12.08.55.png&imgrefurl=http%3A%2F%2Felcamion.co.uk%2Fchristmas-traditions-in-mexico%2F&docid=lS5tWzmzSGiIrM&tbnid=ylhhegGTIRWKpM%3A&vet=10ahUKEwjdtbXq5NPmAhVaCM0KHeekD_4QMwhIKAUwBQ..i&w=1018&h=772&bih=814&biw=972&q=Christmas%20procession%20Mexic&ved=0ahUKEwjdtbXq5NPmAhVaCM0KHeekD_4QMwhIKAUwBQ&iact=mrc&uact=8
Holidays In Mexico Medical Tourists Celebrate And Get Well.

Merry Solstice, Saturnalia, Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, or whatever name you prefer for a couple weeks off to begin winter. If you’re a medical tourist to Mexico, your hosts celebrate these holidays uniquely. And they invite everyone.

Holidays In Mexico Medical Tourists Celebrate And Get Well: procession

Large cities such as nearby Guadalajara behave similarly to Americans with frenzied shopping. But Christmas in smaller towns and villages differs. Villagers emphasize family and tradition more than gifts. Most buy their presents December 23rd. Then cars and pedestrians crowd streets and stores.

Mexicans have had decorations up for weeks. They celebrate with vigils, processions, and posadas. December 16, they commemorate Mary and Joseph’s search for a room. A parade of children and adults–often featuring Mary and Joseph riding on donkeys–visit houses. They ask for shelter but neighbors turn them away. Finally one pre-arranged house accepts them. They celebrate with food, drinks, and piñatas–a posada. Mexicans welcome visitors to join the processions and sing along.

Holidays In Mexico Medical Tourists Celebrate And Get Well: piñata

Blindfolded children take turns hitting the piñata. They use a stick that suits their age/height. Each child’s turn lasts as long as it takes to sing the piñata song.

Today piñatas come in all shapes and sizes. Traditionally piñata had seven cones representing the seven deadly sins. The stick kids use represents love destroying sins. The spilled treats symbolize forgiveness.

This ceremony combines Catholic and ancient Aztec traditions. On their war god’s birthday, Aztecs filled a clay pot on a decorated pole. They offered him the tiny treats that fell out.

December 24, stores close early. At midnight, Mexicans feast. December 25, many restaurants are open, serving medical tourists traditional dinners.

In this season of peace, give yourself peace of mind. Become a medical tourist to Mexico. Receive the best care possible anywhere. And save hugely at the same time. Contact DocTours to arrange your appointments and all else.

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Author: jeffery

Traveler, Next-Pat, organizer of for-profits and non-profits, author published in both the popular and academic press (usually on "geonomics" or ecological economics), and inventor of non-polluting engine, conscious-raising language, and other goodies.

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